Should You Worry About Bedwetting?

Should You Worry About Bedwetting?

Does your child wet the bed? You may wonder if it’s normal and worry about what to do. Here are the answers.

Is it normal?

Almost half of all three-year-olds and 40% of four-year olds wet their beds multiple times a week. Additionally, 20-25% of five-year-old children and 10-15% of six-year-olds don’t stay dry every night. These percentages conclude that bedwetting, called Enuresis (“en-yur-EE-sis”), is normal behavior at these ages.

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How To Stop the Constant Interruptions

How To Stop the Constant Interruptions

Is your child constantly interrupting you? You could be talking to a friend on the phone, replying to an important e-mail, or having a conversation with your spouse, and suddenly your child chimes in with a question or request. Believe it or not, the reason behind these interruptions is that they want your attention and, when they interrupt, they’re guaranteed to get it. The good news is that children can be taught that other people besides themselves have needs to be addressed. Below are some tools to help you teach your child how to be mindful of other’s needs and put an end to constant interruptions.

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Handling Tantrums

Handling Tantrums

Yes, tantrums are normal. Almost all kids do it at some point. But even if you expect it, there are few things are more exhausting than dealing with a temper tantrum. Watching your child scream and kick and lose all control can make you feel completely powerless, since it seems that nothing you do can stop it. Learning where the tantrum is coming from will often make the outburst easier to handle.

Tantrums explained

The root cause of most temper tantrums lies in the fact that the child is experiencing big emotions and is unable to properly express them. While it appears the tantrum is due to something simple—being given water instead of milk, or wearing pants when she wanted to wear a dress—these events are not the root cause for the meltdown. Oftentimes the underlying reason for the tantrum is that she is tired, hungry, or frustrated and this short fuse is what ignites the outburst.

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What Do You Do When Your Preschooler Reverts To Baby Talk?

What Do You Do When Your Preschooler Reverts To Baby Talk?

Your preschooler is talking more like a baby and less like a preschooler. It used to be cute—when she actually was a baby! How can you solve this problem?

Why they do it
Many preschoolers are under the impression that talking like a baby makes them more adorable. Also they think it will help them win you over. While this behavior is completely normal, and will usually go away by itself with time, it can be bothersome when you want your child to “act her age.” Putting into action the suggestions below may help you get out of this phase more quickly than merely waiting it out.

Your child may need more attention
Children know they’re moving away from being a baby—a phase where they understood your expectations of them—and may be trying to hold on to that safer and easier time by talking like a baby. This transition is a very real problem for some children. You can help your child feel more secure during this time by giving an extra dose of affection. This will provide him with the courage he needs to move forward.

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Ouch! My Child Bit Me!

Ouch! My Child Bit Me!

“When I was getting my son dressed this morning he got upset over my choice of shirt for him. As I was putting it over his head he bit my arm. I was so startled by this that I nearly cried!” ~ Rachel, mom to 2-year-old Trevor

First: Think about it.
It’s natural to be shocked or hurt by your child’s actions, but rest assured that your little one didn’t intend to injure you; he just couldn’t find the right words or actions to get his point across, and a quick bite seemed like the right solution. It helps when you understand that this behavior is normal, and that it’s usually not intentional misconduct. Nonetheless, it is something you’ll want to put a halt to – immediately. This is an opportunity to teach him a lesson in social skills. Here are some tips on what to do next time it happens.

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What Should I Say When My Child is Hurt or Scared?

What Should I Say When My Child is Hurt or Scared?

Don’t cry, you’re okay.” “Everything will be fine.” “You have nothing to worry about.” These are such natural adult responses! But your child is very likely thinking: “But it DOES hurt!” “I AM worried!” “It’s NOT okay!

Children, like adults, do feel what they feel; telling them that they don’t just confuses and frustrates them, but doesn’t make the feeling go away. In fact, the child will feel misunderstood and lonely in her fear, pain or worry. In addition, when it comes to physical pain, every human being has a different tolerance level. What “doesn’t hurt” for one person may indeed hurt another. It’s impossible to judge another person’s pain—physical or emotional.

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How To Make Mealtime Fun for Your Picky Eater

How To Make Mealtime Fun for Your Picky Eater

When you have a picky eater in the house it can turn every meal into a battle. Brightening up the mood and getting creative with food are great ways to take the stress out of mealtime and bring more joy to your table, while getting your little one to eat. Try a few of these suggestions.

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